GESTURE AND MATTER

As I see it, the hand as well as the entire body are gifted with imagination. My pieces can be described as architectures made by thinking bodies. They require a delicate balance between functionality and lightness. When the audience finally assists to the construction of the piece they witness the result of a long process, during which the quality and the source of movement, the use of materials must be reevaluated constantly. Most of the performers I’m working with have a dance background. Therefore the tools we use to work together come from dance: perception, movement memory, precision, coordination, rhythm, presence…

As living beings our development, our anatomy, our senses result of the many and ongoing interactions we have among us and with our environment. Undoubtedly we can see the world changing and the damage done by human hands.

By researching ways of transforming and recomposing the dancer’s knowledge of the body, using material manipulation to do so, I have the desire to open up a space and a time where anyone can revive an intimate, singular way of belonging in this world. The articulation between gesture and matter, between each individual and the world set up a possible space for a double movement of exchange that could be durable and transformative.

 

TIME AND PUBLIC SPACE

Many years ago I decided to step off theatre stages to bring the work to public spaces and landscape. When performing outside, the space occupied by the dancers, by the spectators, the light, the sound, all turn into unstable elements. It is a matter of negotiation with ever-changing conditions in each landscape, each town. All my pieces – even if they follow a very precise partition– work on establishing a relationship with each context of showing, whether it means being in complementarity or in contrast with it. Creating in and for public spaces enables me to explore new directions and to experiment being in a monumental approach in the relation to the object. Working at this extraordinary scale moves the perception we have of ourselves and of our situation.

In this way my creations are an attempt at opening up a different sense of time for each spectator, a time where it is possible to discover and revisit our apprehension of a given and well-known context, in which we have habits and personal bearings. A landscape or a city have their own sense of time, marked by natural cycles and human transformations, that occur at individual and societal levels. I believe that our perception of time is closely related to movement and to the relation we have to space. In that regard, the pieces I create are an invitation to the spectators to choose their own temporality, whether it means losing the sense of time or taking time. Simply taking the time to enjoy where they are.